Masterson Method® Educational Articles

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Below is a question that was asked on the Masterson Website Question & Answer webpage recently and instead of answering directly to the person who asked the question, we chose to challenge our in-house anatomy junkie, Lorre Mueller (as well as MMCP, Instructor, Coach and Mentor and Equine Osteopath EDO®). Lorre asked if she could write an article instead, knowing that this is a pretty common problem and that many people may have the same…
Tension accumulates in the muscles and connective tissues of the body that can negatively affect range of motion, performance, and willingness to perform in the horse. The accumulation of this pain and tension can be the result of many things. The normal ones we would think of from the perspective of the human athlete would be repetitive motion and over-exertion of the muscle. We would recognize these from the pain, or from the noticeable effect…
Question: I have a mare that suddenly began switching leads behind about a year ago. We worked on holding the canter and that worked for a few months, but recently she has gone to not wanting to get off of the left lead. When I try to put her on the right she'll switch behind, preferring cross-cantering to staying on the right lead. The vet did a lameness evaluation and could find nothing in the…
Unlike humans, horses do not have a joint that connects the shoulder blade and the forelimb to the body. The shoulder blade is attached to the horse’s body by a complex system of muscles, fascia, and connective tissue, meaning there is no skeletal connection at all. Range of motion of the forelimbs becomes restricted when muscles that are responsible for moving the front leg forward and backward accumulate tension and are unable to function normally.…
Where is the Bladder Meridian? In Chinese medicine there are twelve primary acupuncture meridians in the body. The Bladder Meridian is one of the major acupuncture meridians that has a unique effect on balancing the other acupuncture meridians. It runs down each side of the body, about two inches parallel to the topline, then down the side of the hind leg, just off the center line. We use the Bladder Meridian to begin our work…
Temporal mandibular joint issues can create tension in the poll, and vice-versa says, equine bodywork therapist Jim Masterson. And conversely, pain or restriction in the poll will affect other parts of the body. “Issues in your horse’s body have a way of reflecting in his poll and atlas,” explains Masterson. Therefore, tension and pain he might have from a sore back or compensation for pain in other places - such as the feet - is…
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